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The Flight Student https://theflightstudent.com Learning to fly, one step at a time Fri, 02 Jun 2017 18:20:29 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 134779393 Passing the FAA Part 107 Exam https://theflightstudent.com/drones/passing-faa-part-107-exam/ Fri, 02 Jun 2017 18:04:35 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=173 Passing the FAA Part 107 Exam I have been flying drones for the past couple of years but until today I could not claim to do so legally for hire. Thanks to the FAA having integrated drones into the National Airspace System, they have come up with a framework for legalizing what so many people […]

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Passing the FAA Part 107 Exam

I have been flying drones for the past couple of years but until today I could not claim to do so legally for hire. Thanks to the FAA having integrated drones into the National Airspace System, they have come up with a framework for legalizing what so many people have been doing for several years – finding ways to use their drones to create content that creates value, value that can be exchanged between individuals and companies.

The method for obtaining this license from the FAA is a practical knowledge test consisting of 60 questions. These questions range from airspace rules, sectional map knowledge, aerodynamics, and the rules and regulations that have been set forth by the FAA.  Studying for this exam is similar to regular pilot training ground school, but that is something that a person not familiar with these things may find hard to digest.

Jason Shappert, of M-Zero-A fame, is a flight instructor in Florida that has taken his flight training to a whole new level by going on-line to offer e-products to help people learn how to master the tests they need to pass to receive their pilot certificates and to make them better and safer pilots – as he says: ‘A good pilot is always learning’. I have been watching the content Jason has been producing and was always impressed with it. He speaks concisely and clearly and is obviously an excellent communicator. Finally, when it was time for me to finally take the Part 107 certificate written exam, I chose to learn from Jason, purchasing his RemotePilot101 program. I took the test today, May 6th, and managed to get a score of 93%!  On my first time, too!  I suggest that if you are considering getting a Part 107 Certificate, you have to check out his program for yourself here: RemotePilot101.com .  Full disclosure: I paid for my RemotePilot101 course on my own but when I saw how effective it was, I wanted to share it with others who may be helped by it. By following the links on this page and purchasing the program, I will receive a commission, but I would not recommend a product unless I personally tried it and saw benefit. I highly recommend you check it out for yourself!

Side note:  First lesson in flying the DJI Mavic Pro:

My VLOG on passing the Part 107 exam:

The FAA has made available an on-line method of obtaining waivers for operation in situations that are specifically forbidden under FAR part 107.  This includes rules such as nighttime operations, ops over people, and ops in non-Class-G airspace. This last point, covered under FAR 107.41, is most relevant if you operate in an urban environment that is the usual patchwork of Class B, C, and D airspace.   Here are some sample sectional chart examples of LA and NY airspace. NY is the place where Casey Neistat, the famous vlogger, got in trouble with the FAA for his exquisite aerial imagery captured in NYC.  (Good work on the VLOGs, Casey!)

This is the New York City airspace – note the HUGE class Bravo that covers most of the spots that are interesting to shoot.

LA is not quite that bad, as we have one Class Bravo airport – LAX – with a fairly limited approach and departure lane, East-West.  That leaves most of the city open to operation. Ironically, the most intrusive airspace is the Class Delta around KSMO (Santa Monica Municipal Airport) This is my local favorite airport and the place where I am learning to fly. Sights such as the Santa Monica Pier are smack dab in the middle of this Class Delta!

Here is the link to the on-line form where you can request a waiver to operate: https://www.faa.gov/uas/request_waiver/

passed my part 107 exam

True to RemotePilot101.com ‘s promise, I passed the Part 107 written test with a score of 93% on the first try. The test is not hard if you study with Jason’s materials, and I can state confidently that I’m a better and more aware pilot as a result of going through their program!

Photo by eschipul

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Seaplanes – A Brief History https://theflightstudent.com/history/seaplanes-brief-history/ Fri, 04 Nov 2016 17:19:53 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=162 Seaplanes – A Brief History As soon as the first plane was invented, it became the founding stone for the sea plane which took of for the first time in 1910. The first sea plane the “Le Canard” flew for 800 meters in its first flight. During the achievements of its era, it was considered […]

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Seaplanes – A Brief History

As soon as the first plane was invented, it became the founding stone for the sea plane which took of for the first time in 1910. The first sea plane the “Le Canard” flew for 800 meters in its first flight. During the achievements of its era, it was considered monumental. Although the first flight of the Sea plane occurred in France, United States would soon follow after with the invention and production of its first seaplane in 19911 by Glenn Curtiss. It was a monumental event for the United States as it signaled a beginning of an era that would mar a huge race in Aeronautics between Europe and the United States.

lecanard

The word Seaplane was meant to symbolize two types of planes associated with the sea. The type that is still used today is the floating plane or the hydroplane that we still see and use today. In this type of a seaplane, the fuselage or the main body of the aircraft never touches water but rather the landing gear touches water. Although this wasn’t common at the beginning, it soon became a worked out and accepted model that can be still seen in service in smaller planes that needs to land on water today. The design of the hydroplane was also used to design aircraft that could land easily on aircraft carriers (which consequently made the United States the most powerful country in the world with the success of its aircraft carriers)

flyboat

The second type of a Seaplane that was very popular in the 1920’s and 1930’s was the Flying Boat. As the name suggests, it was a design that allowed the planes fuselage to act as a boat when it landed on the sea or a body of water. Hence, it was termed the Flying Boat due to its ability to land and take off from water. When a flying boat landed on the water, its main fuselage would sink by 15% into the water for smooth landing and hence it would not use any landing gears. This model of a seaplane termed the Flying Boat was very popular in the 20’s and 30’s and it was even used in the World War I very extensively.

IN time, seaplanes also became commercially feasible. The world’s biggest airline PAN AM used seaplanes as its main carriers for a long time until Boeing Aircraft became popular. Especially in the 20s and 30s, airports and airstrips were not very common due to lack of commercial investment. Thus, seaplanes were the perfect aircraft so that they could be used to land in a body of water especially near coastlines.

A special big sea/airfield was designed in Hawaii to accommodate transoceanic flights that would carry passengers by means of flying boats from Hawaii to Mainland. By the advent of 1940’s the era of airplanes really began and the flying boats as a commercial plane was discontinued. By the 1950’s with the advent of Boeing Aircraft, seaplanes had just become a part of a long forgotten legacy.

So with the WWII, ended the era of the flying boat airline and mainly invented since airlines did not have long runways that could handle large planes. Aids to help in navigation were minimum, weather and other problem created problems for planes and the flying boat seemed to counter them quite effectively.

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Unusual Flight Stories – LAX Shooting https://theflightstudent.com/filming/unusual-flight-stories/ Wed, 31 Aug 2016 16:49:10 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=151 Unusual Flight Stories – LAX Shooting Everyone has their story, the unusual event that happened, the funny thing that tripped them up. Here is a good one from Captain Moonbeam: Yes, I bet you didn’t see THAT coming!  That story trumps my best one, but I’ll get it out anyway. Flying commercial into LAX a […]

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Unusual Flight Stories – LAX Shooting

Everyone has their story, the unusual event that happened, the funny thing that tripped them up. Here is a good one from Captain Moonbeam:

Yes, I bet you didn’t see THAT coming!  That story trumps my best one, but I’ll get it out anyway. Flying commercial into LAX a few days ago, nothing happened out of the ordinary. At first. Touched down, taxied to the gate, and then the captain gets on the intercom and announces that we cannot deplane but that we have plenty of food, water, and working lavatories on board. That is never a good sign! )))  What happened, you ask?

8/28/16 8/28/16 Los Angeles / CA / United States - 8/28/16 Los Angeles / CA / United States - 8/28/16 Los Angeles / CA / United States - 8/28/16 Los Angeles / CA / United States - 8/28/16

Yes, I happened to arrive at LAX a few minutes after there was a hoax shooting. Got to spend 45 minutes sitting in the plane and then work my way through the jam in the airport and at the curb. Took another half hour until traffic started moving and the shuttles could get through. So, what is your most memorable flying-related story?

 

 

 

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Flying Commercial With Pilot Tools (ForeFlight and CloudAhoy) https://theflightstudent.com/gear/flying-commercial-pilot-tools-foreflight-cloudahoy/ Wed, 17 Aug 2016 21:40:57 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=141 Flying Commercial With Pilot Tools (ForeFlight and CloudAhoy) Flying aboard an airliner does not have the same emotional appeal as flying a small plane, behind the controls, in charge, as it were. Its like choosing between Greyhound and driving your own car, but with the 3rd Dimension added in to the mix. Sometimes, though, you […]

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Flying Commercial With Pilot Tools (ForeFlight and CloudAhoy)

Flying aboard an airliner does not have the same emotional appeal as flying a small plane, behind the controls, in charge, as it were. Its like choosing between Greyhound and driving your own car, but with the 3rd Dimension added in to the mix. Sometimes, though, you just have to go commercial, and since I don’t yet have anything beyond a Student Certificate, commercial is all I can fly when leaving the Southern California area.

Off to Central America!

On a recent trip to Costa Rica, I brought along my iPhone with the usual flying tools installed – ForeFlight and CloudAhoy.  I like to play with these and get a better picture of the flights – plane performance, navigation, and airmanship skills. (Yes, presumptuous of someone without even a Sport Pilot Certificate, but indulge me.)  Flying from KLAX to KSJO, I ran CloudAhoy for the takeoff and climbout, along with some video.

The departure from KLAX went smooth as always, with the usual westerly departure over the beach, then a left turn to a more or less direct path to Costa Rica (love those non-stop flights!).

On video, from the same iPhone running CloudAhoy, this looked as follows:

On the return trip, coming in for a stop at KDFW, the pilot came in on a downwind leg, but then made a rather interesting base and final legs. )))   I always thought a nice pattern was one of the first skills pilots have down 100% by the time they get to the ATP certificate, but this one looked…..interesting.

Tracking the same landing with ForeFlight’s tracking feature, then viewing it on their website, this is what I found:

tracklog-ForeFlight-kdfw-landing

Furthermore, ForeFlight gave me the option to download the position data for this leg of the flight in KML, GPX, and CSV formats. (Click on the format name to d/l the file.)

On Google Earth, importing this KML gave this view of what transpired:

kdfw-landing-GoogleEarth-kml

 

 

 

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Young Pilots https://theflightstudent.com/learning/young-pilots/ Fri, 05 Aug 2016 04:25:52 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=136 Young Pilots It never ceases to amaze me to see teenagers go off on their first solo flights at 16 or 17.  I haven’t soloed yet myself, at 45, so this is pretty impressive in my book! Also, having a 14-year-old boy of my own, imagining the maturity level required to be trusted to go […]

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Young Pilots

It never ceases to amaze me to see teenagers go off on their first solo flights at 16 or 17.  I haven’t soloed yet myself, at 45, so this is pretty impressive in my book! Also, having a 14-year-old boy of my own, imagining the maturity level required to be trusted to go up into the air on your own at just 16 is mind-boggling. Anyone else feel similarly?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Strangest Animal Runway Incursion Yet https://theflightstudent.com/accidents/strangest-animal-runway-incursion-yet/ Thu, 04 Aug 2016 08:05:49 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=133 Strangest Animal Runway Incursion Yet I’ve seen a lot of videos and accounts of animals within airport grounds, sometimes interfering with runway operations. Mostly, though, its deer or birds or coyotes. Here’s a new one – a sloth that got inside the perimeter of a small airport in Quepos, Costa Rica, which I happened to […]

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Strangest Animal Runway Incursion Yet

I’ve seen a lot of videos and accounts of animals within airport grounds, sometimes interfering with runway operations. Mostly, though, its deer or birds or coyotes. Here’s a new one – a sloth that got inside the perimeter of a small airport in Quepos, Costa Rica, which I happened to witness first hand. The rescue operation was captured here:

 

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Warbirds – Amazing Pilots of the Past – Ghosts in the Machine – B17 https://theflightstudent.com/warbirds/warbirds-amazing-pilots-past-ghosts-machine/ Tue, 19 Jul 2016 18:49:09 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=121 Warbirds – Amazing Pilots of the Past – Ghosts in the Machine – B17 People say that we never appreciate what we have until we lose them, but a reverse is also true: we don’t know how primitive things are until we look back at them from a future with evolutionary changes.  An iPad that contains […]

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Warbirds – Amazing Pilots of the Past – Ghosts in the Machine – B17

People say that we never appreciate what we have until we lose them, but a reverse is also true: we don’t know how primitive things are until we look back at them from a future with evolutionary changes.  An iPad that contains all the charts, POH, nav logs, CF/D data, and other materials that a pilot needs to have available to him is an evolutionary change in the way pilots go through their career, from student to professional.  Smartphones had this effect on our daily lives by eliminating Thomas Brothers map books and the ability to truly get lost in a city. Drop me in any first world country with my iPhone and a data plan or wifi and I’ll be able to navigate, learn the local language, find things to see and do, and basically live like a local. Flying large airplanes has also evolved, including in some very rudimentary ways. A brief visit to the Palm Springs Air Museum at the Palm Springs Airport (KPSP) and a walk through the ‘Miss Angela’ B-17 on display there brought this fact home.

b17 warbirds museum hangar

Palm Springs / CA / United States - 7/16/16 7/16/16 Palm Springs / CA / United States - 7/16/16 Cathedral City / CA / United States - 7/16/16 7/16/16 7/16/16

Visitors to the museum are encouraged to take a walking (crawling!) tour inside Miss Angela (no pun intended), and there are several details that really stand out to other pilots – details that make the accomplishments of the young men flying these planes into combat, and into 40% attrition rates from flak alone, even more amazing. First – the lack of comfort of any kind. Flying above 30,000 feet in an uninsulated and unpressurized tin can alone is an accomplishment, doing so for hours at a time and into deadly combat takes that up a notch. Second – the controls. The flight deck (see photo above) is spartan, and the yokes are linked directly to the control surfaces via cables. Yes – no hydraulics or mechanical assistance of any kind!  This is an amazing fact when you physically trace the dozens of feet of steel cable that runs along the length of the fuselage, through the bulkheads, and to all the control surfaces. Then you wander outside and see the HUGE size of the ailerons, rudder, and elevators, and wonder further about just how you could move those monsters around with cables. Obviously this WAS done, but the efforts required must have been herculean. And a bunch of 19-20 year olds flew these things into combat, and many never came back. That’s what attracts people to the warbirds – its not just history, its a relic that takes us back to the days of old in a way that no photo, video, or even first-hand account can do…

A Little Background on the B17 Flying Fortress

From WikiPedia:  “The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress is a four-engine heavy bomber developed in the 1930s for the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC). Competing against Douglas and Martin for a contract to build 200 bombers, the Boeing entry outperformed both competitors and exceeded the air corps’ performance specifications. Although Boeing lost the contract because the prototype crashed, the air corps was so impressed with Boeing’s design that it ordered 13 more B-17s for further evaluation. From its introduction in 1938, the B-17 Flying Fortress evolved through numerous design advances.

The B-17 was primarily employed by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) in the daylight precision strategic bombing campaign of World War II against German industrial and military targets. The United States Eighth Air Force, based at many airfields in central and southern England, and the Fifteenth Air Force, based in Italy, complemented the RAF Bomber Command’s nighttime area bombing in the Combined Bomber Offensive to help secure air superiority over the cities, factories and battlefields of Western Europe in preparation for the invasion of France in 1944. The B-17 also participated to a lesser extent in the War in the Pacific, early in World War II, where it conducted raids against Japanese shipping and airfields.

From its prewar inception, the USAAC (by June of 1941, the USAAF) promoted the aircraft as a strategic weapon; it was a fast, high-flying, long-range bomber that was able to defend itself, carried a very good bomb load and was able to return home despite extensive battle damage. Its reputation quickly took on mythic proportions, and widely circulated stories and photos of notable numbers and examples of B-17s surviving battle damage increased its iconic status. With a service ceiling greater than any of its Allied contemporaries, the B-17 established itself as an effective weapons system, dropping more bombs than any other U.S. aircraft in World War II. Of the 1.5 million tonnes of bombs dropped on Germany and its occupied territories by U.S. aircraft, 640,000 tonnes were dropped from B-17s. In addition to its role as a bomber, the B-17 was also employed as a transport, antisubmarine warfare platform, drone controller, and search-and-rescue aircraft.

As of May 2015, ten aircraft remain airworthy. None of them are combat veterans. Additionally, a few dozen more are in storage or on static display. The oldest is a D-series combat veteran with service in the Pacific and the Caribbean.”

 

 

 

And Now, Back to the Present!

There are several B17s restored and currently in airworthy shape around the country.   Miss Angela, a B17G, is one such plane, but I came across some other excellent examples on-line. Here is a flight by another B17G with cockpit view, ATC audio, and excellent exterior shots:

Here is another flying B17, this one owned and operated by the EAA:

 

 

 

 

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Flying Drones for Hire https://theflightstudent.com/drones/flying-drones-hire/ Tue, 05 Jul 2016 04:15:22 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=74 Flying Drones for Hire Big news came down from the FAA this week.  Finally there has been a comprehensive revision of drone flight rules for commercial gain.  What is the background on this?  Well, we all know that the price point for drones that let you create solid footage has been coming down, and is […]

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Flying Drones for Hire

Big news came down from the FAA this week.  Finally there has been a comprehensive revision of drone flight rules for commercial gain.  What is the background on this?  Well, we all know that the price point for drones that let you create solid footage has been coming down, and is now down to ridiculous levels.  Amazon is offering a DJI Phantom 3 Advanced for $775!  I started with the Phantom 1 (which was sadly lost along with my GoPro 3 Black due to a power line incident..), followed by a Phantom 1.1 (still flying as a trainer only), and now I am flying a Phantom 3 Advanced, which is why I can safely recommend it to anyone looking for the least expensive and useful platform for shooting aerial material for anything from company promo videos, to music videos, to feature films.  Yes, there are better drones out there (Inspire 1, for example), but they cost at least 3x more than the Phantom 3 Advanced. If money is no option, get an Inspire, and call me as I’ve a few more toys I need someone to pick up for me in exchange for Producer credit on some projects!  )))   The camera on the Inspire is a bit better, but in my opinion, unless budget is very generous, its not worth the cost in the beginning, before you have established a positive cash flow from all this.

So, you now have a working drone and you’ve practiced flying it, learned the different flight modes, etc. How do you make money with it? Drones are being used to shoot weddings, engagements, music videos, parties, action sports footage, short and feature films, documentaries, advertisements, and probably many more things that I missed. You need to go out and shoot some interesting footage on your own and put together a reel.  Want some examples?

*** youtube clips ***

Now that you have a reel to show, grab yourself a WordPress website and put together an EPK – about you, reel, offer, call to action, etc.  Great!  Next question – how do you do all this legally, without having to look over your shoulder for the police or the FAA inspector?  There’s the key question! You see, flying drones for anything but commercial gain has always been legal – its covered by the same rules that govern R/C model planes. Generally the rule is fly safe, away from bystanders, and remain below 400′ AGL within 3 miles of an airport, among other rules, outlined by the Academy of Model Aeronautics here.  All very commonsense things to keep in mind. What is different about drones?

Drones are simple to fly. Drones are selling like hotcakes – the company that manufactures the Phantom, DJI, is now a ONE BILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS. They own 70% of the market, and for a good reason – their products work. Here is a good write-up on DJI and the drone market.  If you have ever flown an R/C model aircraft – glider, powered, or rotary – you know how difficult it can be to orient yourself to the model and feed it correct inputs. In some ways I can say that it is easier to fly a real plane than a model, because you lack the POV from the cockpit and the seat of the pants feel while flying a model. Modern drones feature amazing stability software/hardware that lets you fly in almost any wind with complete confidence, and get a pilot’s POV with FPV video feed that comes down to your smartphone or tablet, which is how you frame the shot and fly the aircraft. All this means that anybody can get a Phantom drone, go out, and almost immediately cause havoc with it. Bad press. You’ve seen it. Luckily, now we have a legal means to fly drones and be recognized as someone other than the aforementioned yahoo.

The Solution?

The FAA has finally made a decision on the subject of commercial drone use, and in the process has made a distinction between the public getting drones as gifts and playing with them and the people who take flying them more seriously – those who would actually go through the process of flying for hire legally. I’m not one to generally applaud big government agencies/bureaucracies, but this is a good move! What the FAA actually did was to create a new certificate class for UAS (unmanned aerial systems) pilots. This is basically a ‘pilot’s license’ in layman’s terms, just like certificates for Sport, Private, Instrument, and Commercial pilots. For those who hold any non-Student pilot certificate currently, only an exam is needed with a local FAA examiner, while those who are new to flying have to take the written and practical tests.  The press release from the FAA on this can be found here.   The rules set out by the FAA in the new Part 107 section of the FAR/AIM can be viewed here.   I read them – very reasonable stuff, and it covers every drone up to 55lbs gross weight. Trust me – that is a LOT of drone! Feature films shot on Red cameras flown by octo-copters will be easily covered by this, and I don’t see any need to fly anything bigger than this for most commercial uses.

 

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Another Lesson in Takeoffs and Landings https://theflightstudent.com/learning/another-lesson-takeoffs-landings/ Tue, 05 Jul 2016 04:11:21 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=86 Another Lesson in Takeoffs and Landings After 6.7 hours of dual time I have another lesson in takeoffs and landings at the Hawthorne (KHHR). This time I will be doing all my radio communications as we leave Santa Monica (KSMO) and enter LAX Bravo airspace to cross over to the Hawthorne side. I noticed an […]

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Another Lesson in Takeoffs and Landings

After 6.7 hours of dual time I have another lesson in takeoffs and landings at the Hawthorne (KHHR). This time I will be doing all my radio communications as we leave Santa Monica (KSMO) and enter LAX Bravo airspace to cross over to the Hawthorne side.

I noticed an improvement in my pattern work (see CloudAhoy path below) – this time I flew with less involvement of my instructor and called my pattern turn on my own, with the exception of one turn that I was going to make a bit early – from downwind to base – lost track of the ground references and became too eager to turn toward the runway.  Lining up on final, I feel I improved, and AJ only interrupted a couple of times when I got off the centerline and needed help. One thing I need a lot more practice at is properly lining up on the runway – mainly accounting for the fact that my seat is left of the centerline. The correct way is to feel the movement of the plane in relation to the runway, not doing it strictly visually, and that is what gives me some trouble. More practice is in order and coming up shortly!

 

khhr_landings_takeoffs_06272016

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My CFI AJ and I took the Special VFR route over LAX on the way out and the LAX Mini Route on the way back.  Here is the full path we took, courtesy of CloudAhoy.

full_flight_ksmo_khhr_06272016

And here is the full video of the flight (until the battery died, that is!), including the mini route and special rules vfr crossing.

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The Killing Zone – How and Why Pilots Die https://theflightstudent.com/accidents/killing-zone-pilots-die/ Tue, 05 Jul 2016 04:02:41 +0000 https://theflightstudent.com/?p=97 The Killing Zone – How and Why Pilots Die This sounds like a terrible topic for a post on a site that deals with learning to fly – who’d want to fly after reading something that morbid, right?  But actually it is very empowering to study what goes wrong when accidents happen – knowing this […]

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The Killing Zone – How and Why Pilots Die

This sounds like a terrible topic for a post on a site that deals with learning to fly – who’d want to fly after reading something that morbid, right?  But actually it is very empowering to study what goes wrong when accidents happen – knowing this information helps us manage risk by drilling down at the root causes that lead to most accidents. The book by this title, The Killing Zone – How and Why Pilots Die, analyzes statistics of general aviation aircraft accidents and tries to help us do just that – flag the most dangerous behavior and moment in a pilot’s flying career and make him treat flying with more respect when the complacency of perceived mastery kicks in. I first heard about this when getting my motorcycle license – there was research performed that looked at when most motorcycle accidents happened. The surprise there was that most accidents didn’t happen at the very beginning, when a rider had no experience to speak of. Most happened about six months down the road, when the rider began to get his confidence up and started getting cocky on the road. As the saying goes – there are old bikers, there are bold bikers, but there are no old, bold bikers. Same truth applies to flying – as Paul A. Craig analyzed accident data he discovered that there is a ‘killing zone’ in flying as well, and it is located right around 300 hours of flight experience.

Beverly Hills / CA / United States - 7/3/16

As you can see from the graph above,there is a definite peak with a drop-off above 350 hours. Part of the reason is that complacency sets in at about that point, as well as the lack of ongoing flight training that is typically behind low-hour pilots.  Now, as an 8-hour pilot myself I might be a bit inexperienced in this subject, but the argument in the book makes perfect sense. Breaking down the stats further, we see from the book’s data that pilots become more ‘safe’ as they continue to improve their skills by getting newer and more advanced ratings. The book makes a lot of sense and I found it very educational! I highly recommend you buy it from Amazon here and read it thoroughly.

 

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